English III Unit 3

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    Answer a few questions on each word. Get one wrong? We'll ask some follow-up questions. Use it to prep for your next quiz!

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definitions & notes
only words

  1. anagram

    a phrase rearranged from the letters of another phrase
    Puns, palindromes, mirror images,
    anagrams and inversions: these are all pivotal to Wallinger's art, succinct devices for multiplying the nuances of meaning.
  2. anecdote

    short account of an incident
    “How was school today?” might yield the occasional
    anecdote, but most kids clam up and move on.Forbes (Sep 19, 2013)
  3. assertion

    the act of affirming or stating something
    Their
    assertions, in turn, are based on research by several doctors.Slate (Sep 18, 2013)
  4. climactic

    consisting of or causing a decisive moment
    Anthony Joshua, who only started boxing four years ago, won Team GB's
    climactic gold medal on Sunday afternoon in controversial circumstances.
  5. coherent

    capable of thinking in a clear and consistent manner
    The U.S. government’s response has been anything but measured,
    coherent and purposeful.
  6. epilogue

    a short section at the end of a literary work
    After the novel’s plot properly ends, there are three codas, which you could see as
    epilogues or even short stories set in the same universe.Forbes (May 30, 2012)
  7. extemporaneous

    with little or no preparation or forethought
    In typical Clinton form, much of his convention speech was
    extemporaneous.
  8. fidelity

    the quality of being faithful
    Loyalty pays big dividends in business, which is why fostering customer
    fidelity makes good business sense.
  9. forte

    an asset of special worth or utility
    And in general, expanding social insurance against economic risk isn't really libertarianism's
    forte.
  10. fulminate

    cause to explode violently and with loud noise
    As on his blog, he
    fulminates against corruption, accusing officials at all levels of siphoning away revenues that could improve services.
  11. goad

    provoke as by constant criticism
    I
    goaded him a little more, and eventually he cracked.
  12. hypochondriac

    a patient with imaginary symptoms and ailments
    As he picked up the phone to make the call, Wayne Curtis worried that his doctor might think he was a
    hypochondriac.Washington Post (Jul 26, 2010)
  13. inexplicable

    incapable of being explained or accounted for
    Three manatees — the languid, plant-munching, over-upholstered mammals known as sea cows — died suddenly and
    inexplicably, one after another, in a spot where deaths were rare.
  14. noncommittal

    refusing to bind oneself to a particular course of action
    Howard, 27, will test free agency and is
    noncommittal about his plans.
  15. proboscis

    the human nose (especially when it is large)
    So, when
    proboscises get altered, we're thrown off the scent.
  16. prodigy

    an unusually gifted or intelligent person
    Child
    prodigy: A novel cognitive profile places elevated general intelligence, exceptional working memory and attention to detail at the root of prodigiousness.Scientific American (May 22, 2013)
  17. quixotic

    not sensible about practical matters
    He is known for his intensity and somewhat
    quixotic interests, including marathon running and the turtle pond in his New Jersey back yard.
  18. staunch

    firm and dependable especially in loyalty
    Cathedral of New York, the first of seven services that Mr. Thompson tackles today accompanied by a
    staunch supporter, Representative Gregory Meeks.
  19. stigma

    a symbol of disgrace or infamy
    But among military personnel, the
    stigma around getting mental health care lingers.Slate (Sep 19, 2013)
  20. surmise

    infer from incomplete evidence
    Stone
    surmised that they might have been flight attendants who fell out when the plane's tail broke off on impact.
Created on September 25, 2013
(updated September 25, 2013)