compassionate




If you are compassionate, you feel other people’s pain and struggles as though they were your own. Compassionate people are often moved to work to end the suffering of others, perhaps by feeding the hungry or educating the poor.

Compassionate comes from the Old French noun compassion, which means “sympathy, pity.” The adjective, pronounced “cuhm-PASH-uh-nuht,” means “sympathetic,” like a compassionate friend who shares in your joys and sadnesses, wanting the best for you. As a verb, compassionate, here pronounced “cuhm-PASH-uh-nate,” means “pity,” as in your ability to compassionate with stray dogs and cats.

Definitions of compassionate
  1. adjective

    showing or having compassion

    “heard the soft and
    compassionate voices of women”
    Synonyms:

    caring

    feeling and exhibiting concern and empathy for others
    nurturant

    providing physical and emotional care and nourishment
    tenderhearted

    easily moved by another’s distress
    humane

    marked or motivated by concern with the alleviation of suffering
    merciful

    showing or giving mercy
    sympathetic

    expressing or feeling or resulting from sympathy or compassion or friendly fellow feelings; disposed toward
    see moresee less

    Antonyms:

    uncompassionate

    lacking compassion or feeling for others
    hardhearted, stonyhearted, unfeeling

    devoid of feeling for others
    merciless, unmerciful

    having or showing no mercy
    unsympathetic

    not sympathetic or disposed toward
    show more antonyms…

  2. verb

    share the suffering of

    synonyms:
    condole with, feel for, pity, sympathize with
    see moresee less

    types:

    commiserate, sympathise, sympathize

    to feel or express sympathy or compassion
    care

    feel concern or interest
    condole

    express one’s sympathetic grief, on the occasion of someone’s death
    type of:

    grieve, sorrow

    feel grief

Word Family