31051 meaning

Romeo and Juliet Act 1 Scene 1

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definitions & notes
only words
  1. importune
    beg persistently and urgently
    BENVOLIO
    Have you
    importuned him by any means?
  2. propagate
    multiply through reproduction
    Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
    Which thou wilt
    propagate, to have it prest
    With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
    Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
  3. partisan
    a fervent and even militant proponent of something
    They fight
    Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray; then enter Citizens, with clubs
    First Citizen
    Clubs, bills, and
    partisans! strike! beat them down!
  4. transgression
    the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle
    ROMEO
    Why, such is love's
    transgression.
  5. prologue
    an introductory section of a novel or other literary work
    ACT I
    PROLOGUE
    Two households, both alike in dignity,
    In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
    From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
    Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
  6. pernicious
    exceedingly harmful
    What, ho! you men, you beasts,
    That quench the fire of your
    pernicious rage
    With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
    On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
    Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
    And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
  7. chaste
    abstaining from unlawful sexual intercourse
    BENVOLIO
    Then she hath sworn that she will still live
    chaste?
  8. augment
    enlarge or increase
    MONTAGUE
    Many a morning hath he there been seen,
    With tears
    augmenting the fresh morning dew.
  9. gall
    a digestive juice secreted by the liver
    Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
    Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
    Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
    What is it else? a madness most discreet,
    A choking
    gall and a preserving sweet.
  10. mutiny
    open rebellion against constituted authority
    ACT I
    PROLOGUE
    Two households, both alike in dignity,
    In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
    From ancient grudge break to new
    mutiny,
    Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
  11. valiant
    having or showing heroism or courage
    GREGORY
    To move is to stir; and to be
    valiant is to stand:
    therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.
  12. posterity
    all future generations
    ROMEO
    She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste,
    For beauty starved with her severity
    Cuts beauty off from all
    posterity.
  13. grievance
    a complaint about a wrong that causes resentment
    Enter ROMEO
    BENVOLIO
    See, where he comes: so please you, step aside;
    I'll know his
    grievance, or be much denied.
  14. assail
    attack someone physically or emotionally
    She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
    Nor bide the encounter of
    assailing eyes,
    Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
    O, she is rich in beauty, only poor,
    That when she dies with beauty dies her store.
  15. severity
    excessive sternness
    ROMEO
    She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste,
    For beauty starved with her
    severity
    Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
  16. tyrant
    a cruel and oppressive dictator
    SAMPSON
    'Tis all one, I will show myself a
    tyrant: when I
    have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
    maids, and cut off their heads.
  17. overthrow
    rule against
    From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
    A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
    Whole misadventured piteous
    overthrows
    Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
Created on July 22, 2010
(updated July 22, 2010)